It’s funny how life works. By the time we reach adulthood, we find ourselves caring for those who looked after us when we’re small. Taking on the care of an elderly loved one can be challenging, we, of course, want what’s best for them but we have to be able to fit this around our own busy lives too which often involve raising kids, work and running a home. Here are a few options to consider, the right choice will depend on your circumstances.

we find ourselves caring for those who looked after us when we’re small. Taking on the care of an elderly loved one can be challenging, we, of course, want what’s best for them but we have to be able to fit this around our own busy lives too which often involve raising kids, work and running a home. Here are a few options to consider, the right choice will depend on your circumstances.

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Move in Together

Does your loved one have a condition that occasionally flares up, or are they at risk of strokes or heart attacks? If so, having them nearby can be the best option just in case something happens. It means you’re there to keep an eye on them and promptly call the emergency services if needed. Your options are, you moving in with them, them moving in with you or you getting a new property together. You need to ensure you have enough space and the facilities you need. For example, if they’re in a wheelchair then hard flooring to make it easy to wheel around and a downstairs bedroom and bathroom will both be useful. Otherwise, adaptations like a stairlift might be needed. Living with your loved one makes caring for them much easier, and means they can still largely keep their independence especially if they’re living in something like an annex. But having them nearby is a smart move if they’re at risk. You can take an added measure by having them use a medical alert device for those instances when you are not around or if they reside on a separate floor of your residence.

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Get Home Help

Maybe you live with your loved one but aren’t at home for a part of the day, or perhaps they are living independently. Either way, getting some home help can be a good move. Depending on how serious their condition is, home help could be anything from a maid that comes round once a week a daily meal service to having a carer come and take care of their personal needs. People with dementia, for example, can still live independently in the early stages providing they get the right dementia care. Those with other disabilities and health issues could be helped by a general carer. Home help can cost significantly less than moving into a facility full time, so the financial aspect is worth considering too.

Consider a Nursing Home

Nursing homes can get a bit of a bad rep, with cases of nursing home abuse many people have had to seek professional advice- more info on the hiring a personal injury attorney here. However, of course, they’re not all bad and so it’s important to do your research and find a good one. The benefits of a nursing home mean round the clock care, if your loved one has a condition that’s more difficult to manage then you have peace of mind that they’re getting the right help. Good nursing homes will also provide a nice, homely environment and the residents are able to socialize together which can be highly beneficial.

 

Are you looking after an elderly or disabled relative? What advice would you give to others in the same boat?

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